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Addition impact of biochar from different feedstocks on microbial community and available concentrations of elements in a Psammaquent and a Plinthudult

TitleAddition impact of biochar from different feedstocks on microbial community and available concentrations of elements in a Psammaquent and a Plinthudult
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsMuhammad, N., Brookes P. C., and Wu J.
JournalJournal of soil science and plant nutrition
Date Published2016
Abstract

Biochars generated from swine manure, fruit peels, Phragmites australis and Brassica rapa were applied to a Psammaquent and a Plinthudult. The Phospholipid (PLFA) markers indicating different microbial communities and available concentrations of elements (K, Ca, Na, Mg, Al, Cr, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, As, Mn, Fe, B, Mo) were measured. Relationships between microbial communities and available concentrations of elements were also calculated. Microbial communities such as bacteria, fungi, protozoa, actinobacteria, G+ve and G-ve were significantly changed within biochar type and application rate compared to the control soils. The ratio of PLFAs indicating nutritional and environmental stress in microbial communities were increased in all biochar treatments to the Plinthudult but reduced in the Psammaquent compared to the control soils. The biochar addition to soils also changed the soil available element concentrations. Such as, swine manure biochar 3% significantly increased the Ca, Mg, Cu, Zn, As and Mo available concentrations in both soils. Study concludes that different biochar types and addition rates to soils changed the microbial community structure and available element concentrations in soils. Furthermore, biochars containing lower concentration of elements such as fruit peel and B. rapa biochar application to soils can reduce the availability of elements in soils.

URLhttp://www.scielo.cl/scielo.php?pid=S0718-95162016005000010&script=sci_arttext
DOI10.4067/S0718-95162016005000010
Short TitleJ. Soil Sci. Plant Nutr.