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Bioenergy-derived waste biochar for reducing mobility, bioavailability, and phytotoxicity of chromium in anthropized tannery soil

TitleBioenergy-derived waste biochar for reducing mobility, bioavailability, and phytotoxicity of chromium in anthropized tannery soil
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsHerath, Indika, Iqbal M. C. M., Al-Wabel Mohammad I., Abduljabbar Adel, Ahmad Mahtab, Usman Adel R. A., Ok Yong Sik, and Vithanage Meththika
JournalJournal of Soils and Sediments
ISSN1614-7480
Abstract
Purpose
This study was aimed to investigate the potential of biochar (BC), a waste byproduct of a bioenegy industry, Sri Lanka, as a soil amendment to immobilize and reduce the phytotoxicity of Cr in tannery waste-polluted soil (TWS).
Materials and methods
The TWS and bioenergy waste BC were characterized for physio-chemical parameters. A pot experiment was conducted by adding three BC application rates, 1, 2.5, and 5 % (w/w) to investigate the immobilizing capacity and bioaccumulation of chromium (Cr) in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Soils and plants were digested via microwave digestion and analyzed for total Cr. Further, sequential extraction was conducted to assess the fractionation of Cr before and after the application of bioenergy waste BC on TWS.
Results and discussion
The total Cr concentration in TWS was 12,285 mg/kg. The biomass of tomato plants grown in the 5 % BC amendment doubled compared to the biomass in BC-unamended soil. Bioaccumulation of Cr in plants grown in 5 % BC-amended TWS showed a decrease by 97 % compared to that of the BC-unamended soil. The CaCl2 extractability of Cr indicated that the bioavailability of Cr in the 5 % BC amendment has decreased by 68 % compared to the control. Sequentially extracted Cr in the exchangeable fraction decreased by 98 % in the 5 % BC amendment.
Conclusions
Pore diffusion, and adsorption via π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions were the primary mechanisms to be involved in the Cr retention in BC. Results suggested that the addition of BC to TWS reduces the mobility, bioavailability, and phytotoxicity of Cr in tomato plants.
URLhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11368-015-1332-y
DOI10.1007/s11368-015-1332-y
Short TitleJ Soils Sediments